GBNERR welcomes Lynn Vaccaro

GBNERR welcomes Lynn Vaccaro

Our new Coastal Training Program Coordinator has arrived, and we cannot wait for you to meet her. Lynn Vaccaro grew up in the seacoast region of NH and spent the last 12 years at Michigan Sea Grant and the University of Michigan Water Center. With training as an educator and a scientist and extensive experience working with researchers, decision makers and local communities in the Great Lakes region, Lynn is a perfect fit to lead municipal outreach and technical assistance for the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Most recently, Lynn has been the collaborative research manager for the NERRS Science Collaborative. In Michigan Lynn ran research competitions, facilitated sharing between projects, organized workshops and learning opportunities, led communication efforts, and developed resources for scientists interested in connecting their work to coastal management. Please help us welcome Lynn back to the seacoast and into her new role with New Hampshire Fish and Game.

2020 NERRS Annual Meeting

2020 NERRS Annual Meeting

During the summer of 2020, many people and organizations around the country took a hard look in the mirror and asked themselves tough questions about race, diversity, justice and inclusion. As with many science and conservation groups around the country, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) is not representative of the demographics of the nation and is not doing as much as we can to welcome all types of people into our programs, our leadership and our decision making.

Native Americans Around Great Bay

Native Americans Around Great Bay

Visiting the Great Bay Discovery Center in the fall is a special experience. The cool crisp breeze and colorful leaves make sights along the bay more stunning than usual. Not only are the sights at Great Bay welcoming, the grounds hold cultural and historical significance as well. The “msquamskek” or Squamscot Indian tribe were among the first Native Americans to inhabit the coastal shores of Great Bay.

Trails for People and Wildlife

Trails for People and Wildlife

Hiking, mountain biking, bird watching, and horseback riding are just some of the ways we get outside to enjoy nature and relax. However, even these seemingly low-key activities can have a negative impact on wildlife by reducing their abundance, reproductive success, or even survival. A new mapping tool and guide called Trails for People and Wildlife aims to encourage people to get outside and enjoy nature while allowing wildlife to thrive.

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