Volunteerism in 2020

Volunteerism in 2020

This year started out like any other for us, with fun winter programs and big plans for spring! Typically our volunteer trainings begin in March and continue throughout the year, with our biggest training in April for our spring education programs. It became clear in mid-March that this year would not be like any other and we would have to reevaluate what programs and volunteerism would look like at the Reserve.

Snags, Logs, and Brush Piles, Oh My!

Snags, Logs, and Brush Piles, Oh My!

What happens to trees after they die? Once a tree dies from disease, fire, storms etc., they are still extremely useful and beneficial to their ecosystem. There are two types of dead trees, snags and logs. A snag is a standing dead tree, which remains upright and decomposes naturally. When a standing dead tree or part of a tree falls to the ground, it is considered a log. Both snags and logs serve as a habitat for over 1,000 species of wildlife.

There’s and App for That: Cool Nature Apps

There’s and App for That: Cool Nature Apps

If you are like me, the current circumstances have me venturing outside more and more as the weather improves. Like most people, when I am off the beaten path, I have my phone along for safety and picture taking. I also have several free apps installed on my phone to use while I am discovering in the outdoors. I thought I would share some of my favorites…

Osprey Banding at Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Osprey Banding at Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

The Great Bay Discovery Center has been enjoying a pair of ospreys on the edge of the property for close to a decade now. This year’s pair of ospreys is incubating 3 eggs and now occupy the new nest and yesterday, under ideal conditions, Reserve staff Beth Heckman and Kelle Loughlin joined Ornithologist Robert S. Kennedy, Ph.D (Bob) in the marsh to band the adult pair.