Osprey on Great Bay

Osprey on Great Bay

The Great Bay Estuary is home to several types of birds. Some are common backyard birds while others are wading birds like the the seasonal Great Blue Heron. If you’re lucky, you might even see some larger predatory birds including the Bald Eagle or Osprey. Each year, several pair of osprey return to Great Bay to lay their eggs and start the next generation.

Nature Therapy

Nature Therapy

Keeping the mind and body happy is an essential part of leading a long and healthy life. There are many ways to stay active physically, but keeping your mind in shape is just as important.

Glenn Cove

Glenn Cove

Our staff are lucky to spend their professional lives trying to deepen our understanding of Great Bay. Our interest in the estuary includes investigating how people relate to Great Bay now, and how they have throughout history. Our cultural history and natural history are interdependent, and whether we are reflecting on Native American summer camps on our shores, colonial trading aboard the Gundalow, the industrial mills our rivers powered, or the current debates about the impacts of development. It is always a thrill to link specific historic activities and trends to the lands that we now steward and to be given an opportunity to interpret both the natural resource and the history of Great Bay. Last week, GBNERR hosted a Lunch and Learn that illuminated the history of a specific Wildlife Management Area within GBNERR, Glenn Cove.

Volunteerism in 2020

Volunteerism in 2020

This year started out like any other for us, with fun winter programs and big plans for spring! Typically our volunteer trainings begin in March and continue throughout the year, with our biggest training in April for our spring education programs. It became clear in mid-March that this year would not be like any other and we would have to reevaluate what programs and volunteerism would look like at the Reserve.

Snags, Logs, and Brush Piles, Oh My!

Snags, Logs, and Brush Piles, Oh My!

What happens to trees after they die? Once a tree dies from disease, fire, storms etc., they are still extremely useful and beneficial to their ecosystem. There are two types of dead trees, snags and logs. A snag is a standing dead tree, which remains upright and decomposes naturally. When a standing dead tree or part of a tree falls to the ground, it is considered a log. Both snags and logs serve as a habitat for over 1,000 species of wildlife.

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