Horseshoe Crabs 101

Horseshoe Crabs 101

Of the many fascinating species found around Great Bay, the horseshoe crab may be the most unique. Despite their name, horseshoe crabs are not actually crabs. They belong to an ancient group of arthropods, more closely related to arachnids (like spiders and scorpions) than the crabs you see today. Known as “living fossils,” this species first appeared in the fossil record ~450 million years ago, which is 200 million years before the dinosaurs!

Osprey on Great Bay

Osprey on Great Bay

The Great Bay Estuary is home to several types of birds. Some are common backyard birds while others are wading birds like the the seasonal Great Blue Heron. If you’re lucky, you might even see some larger predatory birds including the Bald Eagle or Osprey. Each year, several pair of osprey return to Great Bay to lay their eggs and start the next generation.

Christmas Storm, 12-23-22

Christmas Storm, 12-23-22

The storm that hit the coast on Friday, December 23rd caused the Reserve some headaches. A tree went through our kayak pavilion, and the power went out- putting our aquarium animals in danger and our alarms and heating systems on the fritz. But the flooding! Did you get out and see the coast late morning on Friday?

How Ice Forms

How Ice Forms

Love to fish, don’t have a boat? No worries, go ice fishing! The Great Bay Estuary and the freshwater lakes and rivers in the New Hampshire Seacoast are alive with delicious fish even in the dead of winter.

Animal Autographs!

Animal Autographs!

Last week fifteen inches of new snow gave me the perfect excuse to go out in the woods for one of my favorite winter activities, animal tracking. To me, animal tracking does not mean just looking for tracks. Animals leave so many more “autographs” behind that can give you clues to who has been in your favorite piece of woods.